Jul 20 AT 2:37 PM Alberto Vildosola 25 Comments

Video: FreePress videos make fun of AT&T/T-Mobile merger

The AT&T/T-Mobile merger has been a hot issue lately. Both sides of the aisle are arguing fiercely about the pros and cons of the acquisition. One of those arguing against it is FreePress. The nonprofit organization has been aggressively fighting to stop the merger from happening. Today, they took their latest shot at both companies with four videos depicting what would happen if AT&T manages to swallow T-Mobile. Spoiler alert: It won’t be pretty for consumers.

Each different video talks about the ways consumers will be negatively affected by the acquisition. The first one, My Bill, shows what would happen to T-Mobile customers’ bills once they’re moved to AT&T. Put simply, those low prices T-Mobile has will be replaced by AT&T’s not-so-low prices.

The second one, Back to the 80′s, explains how, if the merger is approved, we’d be going back to the good ole days when AT&T owned the whole phone market. Also, legwarmers will become popular again. Damn you, AT&T/T-Mobile!

The third, New Best Friends, is similar to Back to the 80′s. The main point it tries to get across is that people will have less choice and higher prices if the acquisition gets approved. In this one, a clueless Verizon makes an appearance.

The fourth and final video is Jobless. In my opinion, this one is the funniest (baby phones FTW!) and the most likely to connect with consumers. In this economy, everybody is familiar with layoffs. This video shows exactly what would happen if AT&T gets its hands on T-Mobile–a lot of people will get fired.

Pretty funny, eh? If you haven’t done so already, go ahead and “like” your favorite video on Facebook. The video that gets the most Facebook “likes” will be used in a TV ad campaign by FreePress. Afterwards, come back and tell us which one is your favorite.

Alberto is a college student living somewhere between Miami, Sarasota and the World Wide Web. Although a former iPhone owner, Alberto is now a proud Android enthusiast. You can follow Alberto on Twitter and Google+ for his thoughts unworthy of an article.

    Most Tweeted This Week

  • BiGMERF

    Def liking all of them.. i dont care which one they choose !!! stop the merger !

    • http://Website TWiT Commander

      I’m beginning to change my mind about AT&T and the merger. AT&T’s super cute. Is she available?

  • http://Website STOP_MA_BELL

    Brunette is way hotter!

  • http://Website regor412

    i absolutely love the jingle at the end, makes me laugh every time

  • http://Website Vance

    I don’t mind being the customer in that threesome.
    Seriously, though, AT&T should die.

  • http://Website onlyever

    This is a revival of #winning.

    I love the quality of the videos; they’re tongue-in-cheek, while simultaneously being dead serious. The T-Mobile character even looks similar to Carly, the T-Mobile girl! And, they do bring back the feeling from the old alltel commercials, before Verizon bought them…

    I can’t wait to see one of these appear on television; it’s pure genius, and working for a noble cause.

    American mobile competition ftw~

  • http://Website Justin Bieber

    I wanna bang that boy!

  • http://Website William Diaz

    The Blonde is so Reese Whitherspoon, and the brunette is that one chick, Charlotte from Sex and The City I think it is, I dont watch crap like that.

  • http://Website Nick

    The first three videos don’t even speak very much truth.

    First, AT&T can’t void a contract and jack up a customer’s charges at will. The customer would have to agree to this, in writing, or be given the option to leave. I know people who still have their old grandfathered plans from pre-Cingular/AT&T merger.

    Second, AT&T would own approximately 40% of the wireless postpaid market, which is not a majority (which is where monopoly talk can even begin). Once you figure in prepaid carriers and their growth, AT&T will be the biggest force, but will have plenty of competition, and not only from Verizon. Don’t forget, Sprint’s non-competetiveness isn’t the fault of AT&T, T-Mobile or Verizon.

    Third, working off of the already established false premise of the first video, AT&T can’t arbitrarily raise prices of grandfathered T-Mobile customers. Sprint and a number of lower-cost prepaid options and local postpaid carriers exist to absorb defectors, should they find the acquisition to be something they’d rather leave.

    The fourth video hits a chord, and is the only one working from an honest premise. This would be an acquisition, not a merger. That means that T-Mobile would be purchased outright, and the only interest of the existing company that would remain would be one seat on the AT&T board of directors for Deutsche Telekom (T-Mobile USA’s parent company). More than likely, there would be duplication in some positions, and some people would likely be either moved to a different role or laid off. That’s a reality, and the fourth video is the only one with a modicum of honesty in its presentation.

    • http://Website kevin

      Yep, but who pays attention to reality or truth, anymore. Most people will take this at face value, which is what the creator is hoping…

      Excellent post, Nick.

    • http://Website mmalakai10

      well i can say this they will or might honor our contracts with t-mobile. did u forget that after the 2 years honoring ur t-mobile contract that at&t runs on different antenna freguencies so it will work under edge on at&t antennas. end result who wants to return to edge when alot of ppl want 3g and better. prices will go up believe it or not how long u think u are going to hold on to u tmobile phone before it is damaged or breaks completely. 2nd at&t and tmobile so called both have a problem with spectrum. how is merging and taking customers from t-mobile adding them to another grown customer at&t company will help 2 companies with spectrum problems going to solve that problem with spectrum? doesnt make sound logical in any way shape or form. if ur company have a shortage problem and another company is having the same problem u have with shortage, how take over that company is going to help u with ur shortage issue?

      • http://Website Mikey

        All the tmob customers are leaving so it works out well for attnt.

    • http://Website Jonesiw396

      The point I think they are making in the second video is that there really isn’t a choice. It’s not a matter of Sprint being competitive, because they are. It’s a matter of ATT and Verizon being the only carriers to carry GSM phones. Which would mean less choice and less innovation since they would have a majority block and would be able to control what manufacturers bring to market.

      You can’t put aside that T-mobile was a big player in Android being brought to bear in affordable phones. Them and Sprint have been innovators when it comes to phones. Sprint just recently announced the end of locked in bloatware. You won’t get that from ATT unless they notice they are losing customers because of it.

      Basically, if ATT has a controlling block customers will be at their mercy.

  • http://Website Stella

    I love that the videos are funny, short and to the point. The first three represent all my fears about the merger. I never thought about the layoffs but I think that it’s a very good argument, too.

  • http://Website JoshL

    I’m usually very anti-monopoly and pro-competition, but in this case I have to side with the merger. Honestly, T-mobile was not going to last for that much longer on it’s own. It’s been on a downward spiral for quite some time and last quarters financial reports are just an indication of that.

    • http://Website TGeezy86

      Everyone keeps saying Tmobile doesnt turn a profit and thats not true. I’ve seen from many legitimate sources (though it was awhile ago, so I don’t remember) that Tmobile USA did in fact make a large chunk of DT’s income; its just that the shareholders want MORE return than what they’re getting, not that Tmobile is a sinking ship. And on the note of last quarter’s financials, use your brain. You announce that you’re in a bid to be acquired by a company, raising the ire and fear of your loyal customers *alot of whom went to Tmobile to escape FROM At&t* and see how fast and free your downward spiral would be. Furthermore, if you looked in detail you’d see that Tmobile gained more prepaid customers than they lost or gained in postpaid customers. People either jumped ship completely, or abandoned their contracts to avoid being part of At&t.

      • http://Website Craig

        I remember how hard a struggle it was to break-up MaBell some 30 years ago… When AT&T bought up Southwest Bell last year the reunion of the Baby Bells with Ma was complete. Not enough; now they want to eat T-Mobile! I have been a T-Mobile customer for years, and will remain one UNTIL THE DAY ATT&T acquires them… I, for one, will not go back to the future! If anyone thinks for one moment that AT&T will be satisfied with this acquisition, think again! At&T’s ultimate plan for the US is TOTAL DOMINATION of the market… the onto the rest of the globe! American Corporatism AT IT’S WORST!

  • http://mikeriosisawhore@gmail.com Mike Rios

    I’m currently a Virgin Mobile subscriber (a Sprint subsidiary) who lives in the Los Angeles area, and got this text on Tuesday from them that said:

    VMFreeMsg
    Public hearings on proposed AT&T/ Tmobile merger July 21, 25, 27 in Culver City, San Diego, Fresno. More info at “www.cpuc.ca.gov/merger

    Seems like Sprint is really pushing their agenda by attempting to generate consumer outrage. Power to them whatever the case! While I’d love to go to Culver City tomorrow to show my opposition to the merger, it’ll be tough on a work night with such short notice. Anyone else get anything similar to this from either Sprint or Virgin?

  • http://Website Richard Yarrell

    Sprint rules both at&t and tmobile

  • http://www.neilcalvin.com ncalvin

    I want that jingle as my ringtone XD

  1. Def liking all of them.. i dont care which one they choose !!! stop the merger !

    • TWiT CommanderGuest 4 years ago

      I’m beginning to change my mind about AT&T and the merger. AT&T’s super cute. Is she available?

  2. STOP_MA_BELLGuest 4 years ago

    Brunette is way hotter!

  3. regor412Guest 4 years ago

    i absolutely love the jingle at the end, makes me laugh every time

  4. VanceGuest 4 years ago

    I don’t mind being the customer in that threesome.
    Seriously, though, AT&T should die.

  5. onlyeverGuest 4 years ago

    This is a revival of #winning.

    I love the quality of the videos; they’re tongue-in-cheek, while simultaneously being dead serious. The T-Mobile character even looks similar to Carly, the T-Mobile girl! And, they do bring back the feeling from the old alltel commercials, before Verizon bought them…

    I can’t wait to see one of these appear on television; it’s pure genius, and working for a noble cause.

    American mobile competition ftw~

  6. Justin BieberGuest 4 years ago

    I wanna bang that boy!

  7. William DiazGuest 4 years ago

    The Blonde is so Reese Whitherspoon, and the brunette is that one chick, Charlotte from Sex and The City I think it is, I dont watch crap like that.

  8. NickGuest 4 years ago

    The first three videos don’t even speak very much truth.

    First, AT&T can’t void a contract and jack up a customer’s charges at will. The customer would have to agree to this, in writing, or be given the option to leave. I know people who still have their old grandfathered plans from pre-Cingular/AT&T merger.

    Second, AT&T would own approximately 40% of the wireless postpaid market, which is not a majority (which is where monopoly talk can even begin). Once you figure in prepaid carriers and their growth, AT&T will be the biggest force, but will have plenty of competition, and not only from Verizon. Don’t forget, Sprint’s non-competetiveness isn’t the fault of AT&T, T-Mobile or Verizon.

    Third, working off of the already established false premise of the first video, AT&T can’t arbitrarily raise prices of grandfathered T-Mobile customers. Sprint and a number of lower-cost prepaid options and local postpaid carriers exist to absorb defectors, should they find the acquisition to be something they’d rather leave.

    The fourth video hits a chord, and is the only one working from an honest premise. This would be an acquisition, not a merger. That means that T-Mobile would be purchased outright, and the only interest of the existing company that would remain would be one seat on the AT&T board of directors for Deutsche Telekom (T-Mobile USA’s parent company). More than likely, there would be duplication in some positions, and some people would likely be either moved to a different role or laid off. That’s a reality, and the fourth video is the only one with a modicum of honesty in its presentation.

    • kevinGuest 4 years ago

      Yep, but who pays attention to reality or truth, anymore. Most people will take this at face value, which is what the creator is hoping…

      Excellent post, Nick.

    • mmalakai10Guest 4 years ago

      well i can say this they will or might honor our contracts with t-mobile. did u forget that after the 2 years honoring ur t-mobile contract that at&t runs on different antenna freguencies so it will work under edge on at&t antennas. end result who wants to return to edge when alot of ppl want 3g and better. prices will go up believe it or not how long u think u are going to hold on to u tmobile phone before it is damaged or breaks completely. 2nd at&t and tmobile so called both have a problem with spectrum. how is merging and taking customers from t-mobile adding them to another grown customer at&t company will help 2 companies with spectrum problems going to solve that problem with spectrum? doesnt make sound logical in any way shape or form. if ur company have a shortage problem and another company is having the same problem u have with shortage, how take over that company is going to help u with ur shortage issue?

    • Jonesiw396Guest 4 years ago

      The point I think they are making in the second video is that there really isn’t a choice. It’s not a matter of Sprint being competitive, because they are. It’s a matter of ATT and Verizon being the only carriers to carry GSM phones. Which would mean less choice and less innovation since they would have a majority block and would be able to control what manufacturers bring to market.

      You can’t put aside that T-mobile was a big player in Android being brought to bear in affordable phones. Them and Sprint have been innovators when it comes to phones. Sprint just recently announced the end of locked in bloatware. You won’t get that from ATT unless they notice they are losing customers because of it.

      Basically, if ATT has a controlling block customers will be at their mercy.

  9. StellaGuest 4 years ago

    I love that the videos are funny, short and to the point. The first three represent all my fears about the merger. I never thought about the layoffs but I think that it’s a very good argument, too.

  10. JoshLGuest 4 years ago

    I’m usually very anti-monopoly and pro-competition, but in this case I have to side with the merger. Honestly, T-mobile was not going to last for that much longer on it’s own. It’s been on a downward spiral for quite some time and last quarters financial reports are just an indication of that.

    • TGeezy86Guest 4 years ago

      Everyone keeps saying Tmobile doesnt turn a profit and thats not true. I’ve seen from many legitimate sources (though it was awhile ago, so I don’t remember) that Tmobile USA did in fact make a large chunk of DT’s income; its just that the shareholders want MORE return than what they’re getting, not that Tmobile is a sinking ship. And on the note of last quarter’s financials, use your brain. You announce that you’re in a bid to be acquired by a company, raising the ire and fear of your loyal customers *alot of whom went to Tmobile to escape FROM At&t* and see how fast and free your downward spiral would be. Furthermore, if you looked in detail you’d see that Tmobile gained more prepaid customers than they lost or gained in postpaid customers. People either jumped ship completely, or abandoned their contracts to avoid being part of At&t.

      • CraigGuest 4 years ago

        I remember how hard a struggle it was to break-up MaBell some 30 years ago… When AT&T bought up Southwest Bell last year the reunion of the Baby Bells with Ma was complete. Not enough; now they want to eat T-Mobile! I have been a T-Mobile customer for years, and will remain one UNTIL THE DAY ATT&T acquires them… I, for one, will not go back to the future! If anyone thinks for one moment that AT&T will be satisfied with this acquisition, think again! At&T’s ultimate plan for the US is TOTAL DOMINATION of the market… the onto the rest of the globe! American Corporatism AT IT’S WORST!

  11. Mike RiosGuest 4 years ago

    I’m currently a Virgin Mobile subscriber (a Sprint subsidiary) who lives in the Los Angeles area, and got this text on Tuesday from them that said:

    VMFreeMsg
    Public hearings on proposed AT&T/ Tmobile merger July 21, 25, 27 in Culver City, San Diego, Fresno. More info at “www.cpuc.ca.gov/merger

    Seems like Sprint is really pushing their agenda by attempting to generate consumer outrage. Power to them whatever the case! While I’d love to go to Culver City tomorrow to show my opposition to the merger, it’ll be tough on a work night with such short notice. Anyone else get anything similar to this from either Sprint or Virgin?

  12. Richard YarrellGuest 4 years ago

    Sprint rules both at&t and tmobile

  13. ncalvinGuest 4 years ago

    I want that jingle as my ringtone XD