Nov 21 AT 2:33 PM Taylor Wimberly 23 Comments

The most vulnerable mobile devices of 2011, Is your Android phone part of the “dirty dozen?”

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Is your Android device vulnerable to a security risk? Bit9 has released their annual report for the most vulnerable mobile devices and the news is not good for many Android owners. As many of us already know, there are a ton of Android devices out there that no longer receive software updates, which means “security vulnerabilities are not being maintained, bugs are not being patched, and loopholes in your system are being left open.”

As Bit9 points out, most consumers do not take security into account when purchasing a smartphone and many of them may not even know that the software on their Android device is out-of-date (sometimes right out of the box).

The “Dirty Dozen” list includes:

  1. Samsung Galaxy Mini
  2. HTC Desire
  3. Sony Ericsson Xperia X10
  4. Sanyo Zio
  5. HTC Wildfire
  6. Samsung Epic 4G
  7. LG Optimus S
  8. Samsung Galaxy S
  9. Motorola Droid X
  10. LG Optimus One
  11. Motorola Droid 2
  12. HTC Evo 4G

Part of me thinks all these mobile malware scare reports are a bunch of bunk, but I do agree that Android software updates are still a problem for all of the US carriers. Google announced a special Android update alliance back in May to address this problem, but we have yet to hear any updates on the program since then (how ironic, right?).

Harry Sverdlove, CTO of Bit9, says that it’s our responsibility to encourage the carriers and manufactures to take this issue more seriously. He explains, “As consumers, one of the best ways we can make our voices known is with our pocket book. We need to put pressure on the manufacturers to either demand a different model where the updates can be centrally managed, or they can be more predictable, or demand that each manufacturer take security more seriously.”

In all my years with Android, I’ve never experienced any mobile malware or viruses. Maybe I’m just lucky or maybe it’s because I don’t download pirated apps and porn from Chinese app stores.

Do you think Android has a major security problem? If so, where should we place the blame?

Source: Bit9

Taylor is the founder of Android and Me. He resides in Dallas and carries the Samsung Galaxy S 4 and HTC One as his daily devices. Ask him a question on Twitter or Google+ and he is likely to respond. | Ethics statement

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