Sep 28 AT 2:34 PM Dustin Earley 50 Comments

Google adds enhanced aerial and satellite imagery to Google Maps, while Apple tells iOS users how to view them

3D Google Earth maps

Google is bolstering their position as one of the most comprehensive mapping services in the world today by adding new high-resolution satellite and aerial imagery to dozens of cities from around the globe, along with new 45-degree imagery as well. Meanwhile, Apple CEO Tim Cook released a statement on Apple.com telling users how to find and use alternative solutions to their own iOS 6 Maps.

Announced on the Google Lat-Long Blog, 51 cities have new 45-degree photography shots available to view in Google Maps, 37 US and 14 international locations. The new pictures added to Maps show off things like the Leaning Tower of Pisa, and The Forks in Winnipeg.

Also added were new high-resolution aerial photography for 17 cities, including everywhere from France to Texas, and new satellite imagery for 112 countries and regions.

Google already has the leading edge when it comes to mapping data and virtual mapping solutions. The constant improvements Google makes and additions like this only help push them further ahead of the competition.

On the other end of the spectrum, Apple CEO Tim Cook has written and posted a letter on Apple’s website that offers a quick explanation on how iOS users can use the App Store or web browser to find alternatives to the highly criticized iOS 6 Maps app.

Apple has gone so far as to add a map app hub in the App Store to make it easier on consumers. By not having a bonafide native app ready in time, Google is really missing out on some potentially massive traffic to their service. Nonetheless, in Cook’s letter, he mentions that you can pin a link to Google Maps on your iPhone’s homescreen by visiting Google online.

Earlier this week, it was reported that Apple had over one year left in its contract with Google to use their mapping services, but the two couldn’t come an agreement on how the future of Google Maps on iOS would work out. So Apple implemented their own solution, only to have to offer up a public apology for how poorly it turned out.

Source: Lat-Long Blog

Dustin Earley: Tech enthusiast; avid gamer; all around jolly guy.

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