Sep 12 AT 2:08 PM Dima Aryeh 14 Comments

Samsung jumping in on the 64 bit processor game

Samsung

With the announcement of the iPhone 5S, Apple introduced their newest mobile processor: the A7. The Apple A7 processor is special in the fact that it’s 64 bit, which is quite impressive in a mobile phone. Is it necessary? It’s arguable, since 64 bit processors come with advantages and disadvantages. However, Samsung is looking to join the game as well.

Samsung has just announced that it will be using 64 bit processors in its next smartphones, possibly the Galaxy S 5 whenever it comes out. Is this just directly copying Apple? No, a few companies have been working with the 64 bit ARMv8 architecture for a while now. But the announcement was no doubt sparked by Apple.

Now, don’t think that 64 bit processors are only good for recognizing anything over 3.5GB of RAM. They do offer faster performance, but at a cost of more memory used. The new wave of 64 bit Android phones will definitely need 4GB of RAM or more. Hopefully Android will support 64 bit by then, because the software needs to be there to take advantage of the hardware.

Source: SamMobile

Dima Aryeh is a Russian obsessed with all things tech. He does photography, is an avid phone modder (who uses an AT&T Galaxy Note II), a heavy gamer (both PC and 360), and an aspiring home mechanic. He is also an avid fan of music, especially power metal.

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  • yowanvista

    Why jump on the 64-bit bandwagon when the current Exynos are already capable of 40-bit addressing, i.e 1TB (via ARM LPAE)?

  • CTown

    I imagine all ARM SOC makers will eventually make 64-bit chips. Still, it amazes me that Apple is the first to make a CPU based off ARMv8 since Apple and Qualcomm essentially start from scratch for their SOCs and Qualcomm has been in the business for so much longer!

  • Nathan D.

    I’m interested to see how android will look speed wise in a 64 bit but I am not expecting anything spectacular

  • mrjayviper

    Unless android moves to 64-bit as well and the apps, this will be just marketing.

    during the Apple launch demo, the game developer it took them 2-4 hours to move from 32bit to 64bit. I wonder how easy it will be to do same in java.

    • kg

      It should be zero hour and zero minute and zero second for Java apps since it’s platform and cpu agnostic…

      That one of the key feature of Android apps: they run ‘as is’ on any hardware (arm, x86, x86-64 etc) as long as the OS (Android itself) is ported to that hardware. No need for differents versions (32 bit, 64 bit, arm, x86, whatever) to maintain and debug, it’s much more easy for the devs unlike Windows/Linux and now iOS.

      That’s only true for pure Dalvik(java) apps so not for the native ones (made using the NDK), usually high performance games for instance.
      In pratice, most of these games are made using a mix : they use Java/Dalvik as well as external native libraries (which are 3rd party usually like game engine, sound engine, etc). So they’ll need the 64 bit versions of these libraries to run in 64 bit mode otherwise they’ll just run in 32 bit mode.

  • maek

    All this BS yea 64bit CPU for an OS that isn’t even 64bit.

    How about adding 4g LTE support so people in US don’t need to use qualcrap in their Samsung phones.

  • Darrin Lancaster

    A month or so ago there was an article that Samsung was going to make the A7 chip for Apple.

    • thel0nerang3r

      For a long time Samsung has been the foundry for Apple.

  • okkar

    64-bit processing is NOT about accessing more than 4GB of RAM. First commenter has already highlighted the fact about 40-bit address bus that enables Cortex-A12 to access 1TB.

  • alisiajluckett

    Hidden due to low comment rating. Click here to see.

  1. Why jump on the 64-bit bandwagon when the current Exynos are already capable of 40-bit addressing, i.e 1TB (via ARM LPAE)?

  2. I imagine all ARM SOC makers will eventually make 64-bit chips. Still, it amazes me that Apple is the first to make a CPU based off ARMv8 since Apple and Qualcomm essentially start from scratch for their SOCs and Qualcomm has been in the business for so much longer!

  3. I’m interested to see how android will look speed wise in a 64 bit but I am not expecting anything spectacular

  4. mrjayviperGuest 2 years ago

    Unless android moves to 64-bit as well and the apps, this will be just marketing.

    during the Apple launch demo, the game developer it took them 2-4 hours to move from 32bit to 64bit. I wonder how easy it will be to do same in java.

    • kgGuest 2 years ago

      It should be zero hour and zero minute and zero second for Java apps since it’s platform and cpu agnostic…

      That one of the key feature of Android apps: they run ‘as is’ on any hardware (arm, x86, x86-64 etc) as long as the OS (Android itself) is ported to that hardware. No need for differents versions (32 bit, 64 bit, arm, x86, whatever) to maintain and debug, it’s much more easy for the devs unlike Windows/Linux and now iOS.

      That’s only true for pure Dalvik(java) apps so not for the native ones (made using the NDK), usually high performance games for instance.
      In pratice, most of these games are made using a mix : they use Java/Dalvik as well as external native libraries (which are 3rd party usually like game engine, sound engine, etc). So they’ll need the 64 bit versions of these libraries to run in 64 bit mode otherwise they’ll just run in 32 bit mode.

  5. maekGuest 2 years ago

    All this BS yea 64bit CPU for an OS that isn’t even 64bit.

    How about adding 4g LTE support so people in US don’t need to use qualcrap in their Samsung phones.

  6. Darrin LancasterGuest 2 years ago

    A month or so ago there was an article that Samsung was going to make the A7 chip for Apple.

  7. 64-bit processing is NOT about accessing more than 4GB of RAM. First commenter has already highlighted the fact about 40-bit address bus that enables Cortex-A12 to access 1TB.

  8. Hidden due to low comment rating. Click here to see.