Oct 14 AT 10:52 AM Dustin Earley 16 Comments

LG’s slightly less WTF-worthy G Flex breaks cover

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Closely following Samsung’s announcement of their perplexing curved smartphone, the Galaxy Round, Engadget has just revealed three renders of LG’s first attempt at a device with a bent display: the LG Flex.

Where Samsung’s Galaxy Round is curved from left to right, the LG G Flex is curved from top to bottom, similar to the ergonomical Nexus S and Galaxy Nexus. The G Flex has a much more pronounced curve than those two devices, however, and boasts a six-inch display to go along with it. A solid spec-sheet and price-point have yet to leak on the G Flex, but Engadget claims it will be released next month, just in time for the holiday season. Spec wise, we imagine the device will be relatively high-end.

Much like the Galaxy Round, it’s hard to see the G Flex selling in droves. Especially compared to each device’s closely related non-curved flagship counterpart. Samsung is trying to differentiate the Round from other Galaxy products by adding software features that play nicely with the handset’s unique design. Like the ability to rock the device against its curve to check notifications. It’ll be interesting to see how LG positions the G Flex against devices like the G2.

I can’t see myself buying either of these handsets, but you never know. Are you going to be jumping on the curved smartphone bandwagon, or are you letting this one pass you by?

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Source: Engadget

Dustin Earley: Tech enthusiast; avid gamer; all around jolly guy.

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  • Troik

    It’s nice that the technology is finally there, and it’s definitly something I wanne see on 60+ TVs but that’s about viewing angles, I just don’t see the usecase.

    With the Samsung I could atleast imagine that it would be easier to control with just one hand, since the thumb is rather short, but with this LG here, I’m at a loss.

  • Troik

    It’s nice that the technology is finally there, and it’s definitly something I wanne see on 60+ TVs but that’s about viewing angles, I just don’t see the usecase here.

    With the Samsung I could atleast imagine that it would be easier to control with just one hand, since the thumb is rather short, but with this LG here, I’m at a loss.

  • sdny8

    If the curve was slighter. Think slightly more than a gnex. I think it could be good. Also very slightly curved against the vertical axis. Would protect the screen. I hate how cases interfere with the sides of the display. Especially with smaller and smaller bezels.

  • ElvisonD

    Why do we want or need curved screens again? It looks cool, that’s obvious, but is it really necessary? I hope it stays as a product of preference and not of standard by all companies. We’ll see what these big tech companies can think of.

  • rashad360

    I’m glad LG had the good sense to make the phone bend the proper direction! I’m looking forward to hearing more about this unique phone

    • ZRod

      How so? I’d say for many people it spends more time in their pocket or hands then on their face.
      Besides, it will suck if you lean on a wall or hit a corner.

  • Nate B.

    I think it gives it more character. If they keep the bezel little to none and the same specs, then I think it’s an awesome choice. How will you benefit from this curve? I have no idea, but that’s not the point. I kind of wish the Nexus 5 had this curve.

  • http://muddypa.ws/blog nportelli

    The WTF part is not the curve, it’s the screen size. Do any of these designers use any of these phones?

    • trob6969

      The benefits of a large display vastly outweighs having slightly more room in a pocket…(the one-handed-use thing doesn’t hold much weight anymore now that keyboards can be reduced in size then moved to the bottom corner of an Android phone now)

  • pjamies

    Curved phones like this 1 are a gimmick, and not well thought out. The fact that it cannot be made
    flexible will be a major issue, and 1 that needs to be addressed down the road.
    Flex’y screens have to be accompanied by flexible bodies so as to make the whole unit bend to
    the users needs. Just look at what is coming down the road in the way of smart clothing. Future phones need to morph into a purely physical but fluid state (like a piece of clothing).
    The technology is going there, but this pictured phone is not.
    LG should re think their design, and start focusing on something truly unique and not just copy
    what other companies are doing with this new flexible screen technology, as its old hat and gimmicky!

  • thymeless

    I’m not seeing the benefit of the curve in this phone either. Harder to stash in a pocket, more chances for glare.. Face hugging is not high on my list of phone requirements.

  • jamal adam

    It’s a really interesting design and one that paves the way for more innovation and bright ideas but at the moment I wouldn’t buy one because it’s still in the early stages. The future seems bright for these kinds of devices when they are perfected.

  • Adam

    Curved screens (a la Gnex) are great for use ‘in the field” or someplace outside a cubicle job where you constantly have to access your phone and then put it down, and then pick it up, and then put it down someplace else, on random but constantly changing environments, like a photo/video/film shoot. My Gnex in a Otterbox Commuter case with rubberized corners can go face down and pretty much stick like a gecko to almost anything, on a variety of angles and shapes, and not slide off crashing to the floor, all the while never having the screen actually touching the surface on which it lies, thus keeping it clean and scratch free.

    There doesn’t need to be much of a curve for this to be effective and the Gnex degree of concavity works very nicely. I don’t know how much these new phones are curved but I’m sure there’s a point of too much and then you start hitting negative returns. In any event, 6″ screen is too much to be usable for most people so the idea seams DOA anyway, or at least relegated to niche user.

    I’m about ready to trade up to the next Nexus and I really wish that LG had kept the slight curve of the last 2 Samsung models. A friend has the Nexus4 and despite it being better in every way than my Gnex (except the non-removable battery), I still far prefer the form factor of the Gnex.

  • trob6969

    Does ANYBODY get it? The curve is basically just to show off the display’s bending ability. Although the phone itself is not flexible, this phone IS a huge step in in smartphone innovation because you could drop it on concrete at any angle from any height and STILL not shatter the screen!

    • thymeless

      Why do I care that it bends if it’s not a useful feature in the phone? I get that it bends and that it may help resist breakage. But the curve form factor itself is a loser.

  1. TroikGuest 1 year ago

    It’s nice that the technology is finally there, and it’s definitly something I wanne see on 60+ TVs but that’s about viewing angles, I just don’t see the usecase.

    With the Samsung I could atleast imagine that it would be easier to control with just one hand, since the thumb is rather short, but with this LG here, I’m at a loss.

  2. TroikGuest 1 year ago

    It’s nice that the technology is finally there, and it’s definitly something I wanne see on 60+ TVs but that’s about viewing angles, I just don’t see the usecase here.

    With the Samsung I could atleast imagine that it would be easier to control with just one hand, since the thumb is rather short, but with this LG here, I’m at a loss.

  3. sdny8Guest 1 year ago

    If the curve was slighter. Think slightly more than a gnex. I think it could be good. Also very slightly curved against the vertical axis. Would protect the screen. I hate how cases interfere with the sides of the display. Especially with smaller and smaller bezels.

  4. Why do we want or need curved screens again? It looks cool, that’s obvious, but is it really necessary? I hope it stays as a product of preference and not of standard by all companies. We’ll see what these big tech companies can think of.

  5. I’m glad LG had the good sense to make the phone bend the proper direction! I’m looking forward to hearing more about this unique phone

    • How so? I’d say for many people it spends more time in their pocket or hands then on their face.
      Besides, it will suck if you lean on a wall or hit a corner.

  6. I think it gives it more character. If they keep the bezel little to none and the same specs, then I think it’s an awesome choice. How will you benefit from this curve? I have no idea, but that’s not the point. I kind of wish the Nexus 5 had this curve.

  7. The WTF part is not the curve, it’s the screen size. Do any of these designers use any of these phones?

    • trob6969Guest 1 year ago

      The benefits of a large display vastly outweighs having slightly more room in a pocket…(the one-handed-use thing doesn’t hold much weight anymore now that keyboards can be reduced in size then moved to the bottom corner of an Android phone now)

  8. Curved phones like this 1 are a gimmick, and not well thought out. The fact that it cannot be made
    flexible will be a major issue, and 1 that needs to be addressed down the road.
    Flex’y screens have to be accompanied by flexible bodies so as to make the whole unit bend to
    the users needs. Just look at what is coming down the road in the way of smart clothing. Future phones need to morph into a purely physical but fluid state (like a piece of clothing).
    The technology is going there, but this pictured phone is not.
    LG should re think their design, and start focusing on something truly unique and not just copy
    what other companies are doing with this new flexible screen technology, as its old hat and gimmicky!

  9. I’m not seeing the benefit of the curve in this phone either. Harder to stash in a pocket, more chances for glare.. Face hugging is not high on my list of phone requirements.

  10. It’s a really interesting design and one that paves the way for more innovation and bright ideas but at the moment I wouldn’t buy one because it’s still in the early stages. The future seems bright for these kinds of devices when they are perfected.

  11. AdamGuest 1 year ago

    Curved screens (a la Gnex) are great for use ‘in the field” or someplace outside a cubicle job where you constantly have to access your phone and then put it down, and then pick it up, and then put it down someplace else, on random but constantly changing environments, like a photo/video/film shoot. My Gnex in a Otterbox Commuter case with rubberized corners can go face down and pretty much stick like a gecko to almost anything, on a variety of angles and shapes, and not slide off crashing to the floor, all the while never having the screen actually touching the surface on which it lies, thus keeping it clean and scratch free.

    There doesn’t need to be much of a curve for this to be effective and the Gnex degree of concavity works very nicely. I don’t know how much these new phones are curved but I’m sure there’s a point of too much and then you start hitting negative returns. In any event, 6″ screen is too much to be usable for most people so the idea seams DOA anyway, or at least relegated to niche user.

    I’m about ready to trade up to the next Nexus and I really wish that LG had kept the slight curve of the last 2 Samsung models. A friend has the Nexus4 and despite it being better in every way than my Gnex (except the non-removable battery), I still far prefer the form factor of the Gnex.

  12. trob6969Guest 1 year ago

    Does ANYBODY get it? The curve is basically just to show off the display’s bending ability. Although the phone itself is not flexible, this phone IS a huge step in in smartphone innovation because you could drop it on concrete at any angle from any height and STILL not shatter the screen!

    • Why do I care that it bends if it’s not a useful feature in the phone? I get that it bends and that it may help resist breakage. But the curve form factor itself is a loser.