Nov 20 AT 10:11 AM Nick Gray 7 Comments

HTC One max Q&A

htc-one-max-size

Last week we asked for your questions about the new HTC One max.We’ve been sifting through the comments and have handpicked a select few to feature in today’s Q&A feature. We’ll be taking a much closer look at the HTC One max in the next week or two with our full review. Stay tuned!

Q: Other than the bigger screen, why should I trade it in for a One max?
A: The main draw of the HTC One max is the large screen, but it also has a fingerprint scanner which can be used instead of a lockscreen password or for launching specific apps. And let’s not forget the battery. The One max doesn’t last as long as the new Droid Maxx, but it does keep up with the Note 3′s lasting power.

Q: Is it $250 better than the Nexus 5?
A: Better is a relative term, especially when you’re comparing two devices that are in different categories. If you’re in the market for a huge phone, yes, the One max is $250 better than the Nexus 5.

Q: Will it also come in developer edition so we get the stock Android experience? If not, does it have an unlocked bootloader so we can get more rapid updates from Cyanogenmod?
A: At this point in time HTC has not announced a developer edition of the HTC One max. Keep in mind that a developer edition would technically run HTC Sense, not stock Android. The bootloader on the HTC One max can be unlocked, but the fingerprint scanner is disabled to ensure your fingerprint information is secure.

Q: Considering the average khaki pants pocket, and dress shirt breast pocket, how well do you think it will fit?
A: The only pockets that will comfortably hold the HTC One max are those large side pockets in cargo pants. The HTC One max will fit into front jeans and trousers (as long as they are not too tight), but you will want to remove the phone from your pocket before you sit down. If you plan to put the phone in a shirt breast pocket, don’t be surprised if a third of the phone protrudes.

Q: I know a lot of the pre-production review models had issues with the back panel fitting properly. Has this been addressed satisfactorily?
A: The removable back panel fits pretty well on our demo unit. Unfortunately, the muscle needed to remove it can cause the curved back to bend slightly which may affect the fit over time.

Q: Will it blend?
A: I’m going to say yes. The HTC One max does have a few metal parts which probably don’t blend well, but it’s not as solid as the HTC One.

Q: I can’t tell from pictures but does it have a removable battery?
A: No, the HTC One max does not have a removable battery. If you want a bit more juice, HTC does has a battery flip case that connects with the handset’s pogo pins on the back.

Q: Can I use this as a bmx ramp?
A: You can, but you’re not going to jump far. I suspect you could use the phone as a ramp 2-3 times before it breaks in the middle.

Q: Is the finger print scanner as useful as it is claimed to be? E.g. launching certain apps with different fingers?
A: The fingerprint scanner works as advertised. How useful is it? That’s hard to say. You can scan in up to three fingers, giving you the option to simply unlock the device or launch into a specific app for each finger. Using index fingers is very comfortable, but trying to unlock the HTC One max with any other digit is awkward and annoying.

Q: This Sprint version of HTC One max has a SIM slot but Sprint uses CDMA. Is this a world phone?
A: Sprint does use CDMA, but LTE is a GSM technology which does require a SIM card. Swapping in a SIM card from another carrier displays an error on the screen, explaining that the inserted card is not compatible with Sprint’s LTE network. That being said, I would not be surprised if the developer community finds a way to hack the device to work on other service providers.

Q: Does the One max support QI Wireless charging?
A: No, the HTC One max does not support wireless charging. The pogo pins on the back of the device can be used to charge the phone, but HTC has not released an official dock for the handset yet.

If your question did not get answered, or you just want more information on this device, be sure to check back in the coming weeks for our full review!

Nick is a tech enthusiast who has a soft spot for HTC and its devices. He started HTCsource.com (the first HTC blog) back in 2007 and later joined the Android and Me family in the summer of 2010.

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