Mar 21 AT 3:43 PM Dima Aryeh 13 Comments

Google improves Gmail security by encrypting data between data centers

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Google focuses quite a bit on security, despite its occasional goof up. For example, Gmail users have been using HTTPS encryption by default since 2010. Ever since the huge NSA leaks, Google has been working to make your email unreadable without a legal warrant. Now Google has improved Gmail’s security in response to the NSA news.

A tactic the NSA (or really any hacker) can use is to read your emails is to go in-between Google’s servers. This new security update encrypts those emails so that no one can read them while they’re moving between data centers. This has been Google’s priority since the NSA leaks first surfaced, so it’s good to see the feature finally being implemented.

Security is an issue that’s often taken too lightly in the tech industry. Companies like Snapchat pop up out of nowhere, amass a ton of users and prove that they don’t care about keeping their customer info private. Security should be taken very seriously, though, and should not burden the user. Google’s latest update fits both of those requirements. Are you happy to see this security feature implemented?

Source: Gmail Blog

Dima Aryeh is a Russian obsessed with all things tech. He does photography, is an avid phone modder (who uses an AT&T Galaxy Note II), a heavy gamer (both PC and 360), and an aspiring home mechanic. He is also an avid fan of music, especially power metal.

    Most Tweeted This Week

  • Edward Snowden (world hero)

    Good, a step in the right direction.
    However, we are currently attacking RNGs and Google needs to progress on this level as well.

    Cheers, Edward

  • Anowarhossain
  • aranea

    I feel a little bit better but I also know that NSA will never stop trying. So the best way to communicate securely is in person :)

  • donger

    Awesome.

  • max

    Nothing is gonna change. Please, all, go educate yourself on the right sites, not on mainstream bullshit media sites.
    Nearly everyone, especially your own government, is trying to brainwash you.
    Google and all others are still working with the government, because they HAVE TO.

  • 99steven

    So I read one article about Google spying on our emails, and then I read an article about Google stopping the NSA spying. So I guess Google thinks they have the right, but know one else can. Google I like you getting in the way of illegal spying, but why do you think it’s alright for you to do it?

  • americans are traitors

    the war on terror/nsa continues. lets kill all american traitors.

    proud european
    (never buys anything american again)

    • 99steven

      So know Android or IPhone for you. BlackBerry is Canadian, maybe Europe can save their sorry ass

  • Chris

    But isn’t all of these encryption techniques pretty meaning? If all companies are required to hand over the “keys” to decrypt the data… what’s the point?

  • hogan

    It’s impossible to argue that gmail users aren’t better off using https vs http. Of course it’s better although it’s certainly not news (https for gmail has been around since they first offered it in 2004). The more interesting question is when did Google actually start encrypting communications between their data centres? I’d be stunned if they hadn’t been doing this years ago, if not right from the time they went from one data centre to two. So, I really doubt this is “news” either, it’s just another “me too” about customer data security in a time when people are starting to wake up to what these companies (and related governments) are up to. There are plenty of services out there that offer encrypted email (e.g., xcapsa, hushmail), but only if you’re willing to stop drinking the “free” koolaid and pay for them.

  • Bob Hobson

    One of the most common causes of data getting in the wrong hands is the loss of mobile devices that often contain a frightening amount of private information. I want to share a protection option that worked for me. Tracer tags (mystufflostandfound.com) let someone who finds your lost stuff contact you directly without exposing your private information. I use them on almost everything I take when I travel like my phone, passport and luggage after one of the tags was responsible for getting my lost laptop returned to me in Rome one time.

  • sards

    i thank you google. at least 80% I know , who can access my communications now. if its nsa=im great man. if its google=maybe they want to give (or take) money. at least im sure most , are this two (not even wife? ). hahahaha …

  • hacker

    Google update.willnot.save its users since we willl iprove ourselves far better

  1. Edward Snowden (world hero)Guest 1 year ago

    Good, a step in the right direction.
    However, we are currently attacking RNGs and Google needs to progress on this level as well.

    Cheers, Edward

  2. AnowarhossainGuest 1 year ago
  3. I feel a little bit better but I also know that NSA will never stop trying. So the best way to communicate securely is in person :)

  4. maxGuest 1 year ago

    Nothing is gonna change. Please, all, go educate yourself on the right sites, not on mainstream bullshit media sites.
    Nearly everyone, especially your own government, is trying to brainwash you.
    Google and all others are still working with the government, because they HAVE TO.

  5. 99stevenGuest 1 year ago

    So I read one article about Google spying on our emails, and then I read an article about Google stopping the NSA spying. So I guess Google thinks they have the right, but know one else can. Google I like you getting in the way of illegal spying, but why do you think it’s alright for you to do it?

  6. americans are traitorsGuest 1 year ago

    the war on terror/nsa continues. lets kill all american traitors.

    proud european
    (never buys anything american again)

    • 99stevenGuest 1 year ago

      So know Android or IPhone for you. BlackBerry is Canadian, maybe Europe can save their sorry ass

  7. ChrisGuest 1 year ago

    But isn’t all of these encryption techniques pretty meaning? If all companies are required to hand over the “keys” to decrypt the data… what’s the point?

  8. hoganGuest 1 year ago

    It’s impossible to argue that gmail users aren’t better off using https vs http. Of course it’s better although it’s certainly not news (https for gmail has been around since they first offered it in 2004). The more interesting question is when did Google actually start encrypting communications between their data centres? I’d be stunned if they hadn’t been doing this years ago, if not right from the time they went from one data centre to two. So, I really doubt this is “news” either, it’s just another “me too” about customer data security in a time when people are starting to wake up to what these companies (and related governments) are up to. There are plenty of services out there that offer encrypted email (e.g., xcapsa, hushmail), but only if you’re willing to stop drinking the “free” koolaid and pay for them.

  9. Bob HobsonGuest 1 year ago

    One of the most common causes of data getting in the wrong hands is the loss of mobile devices that often contain a frightening amount of private information. I want to share a protection option that worked for me. Tracer tags (mystufflostandfound.com) let someone who finds your lost stuff contact you directly without exposing your private information. I use them on almost everything I take when I travel like my phone, passport and luggage after one of the tags was responsible for getting my lost laptop returned to me in Rome one time.

  10. sardsGuest 1 year ago

    i thank you google. at least 80% I know , who can access my communications now. if its nsa=im great man. if its google=maybe they want to give (or take) money. at least im sure most , are this two (not even wife? ). hahahaha …

  11. hackerGuest 1 year ago

    Google update.willnot.save its users since we willl iprove ourselves far better