May 31 AT 5:01 PM Dima Aryeh 4 Comments

Motorola releases source code for Moto E, updates RAZR M/HD code to KitKat

moto g generic 2 Screen Shot 2014-05-13 at 5.03.52 AM

If you’ve picked up a Moto E for the purpose of modifying it, today is your lucky day. Motorola has released the full source code for the device, allowing developers to start building their own kernels. This means you’ll soon see new advancements in the modification scene, assuming enough developers have the Moto E. But at that price, it’s hard to resist.

Motorola has also updated the source code for both the Motorola RAZR HD and the RAZR M. The source code is now for Android 4.4.2 KitKat, the version the devices are running. Good news for everyone, and it’s good to see Motorola supporting these devices.

If you’re interested in modifying your Moto E, head to GitHub in the source links to download the source code. Also, make sure you take advantage of Motorola’s official bootloader unlock method to get started. How many of you have purchased a Moto E, and do you plan on modifying it?

Source: Motorola, GitHub

Dima Aryeh is a Russian obsessed with all things tech. He does photography, is an avid phone modder (who uses an AT&T Galaxy Note II), a heavy gamer (both PC and 360), and an aspiring home mechanic. He is also an avid fan of music, especially power metal.

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  • GOLDEN

    I like that Motorola dorid

  • Castuis

    Having the source code is more about porting over roms or developing new ones for the device, it’s also better to head over to XDA forums than to github. This author doesn’t seem to familiar with Android dev imo.

    • http://www.androidandme.com Dima Aryeh

      The source code is used to build new kernels, which is what is most important. Without source, kernels cannot be modified. Often enough, the situation is that an AOSP ROM cannot run on the stock kernel, it needs a modified kernel to run properly. Which is why source is important, with source you can modify kernels to start porting various ROMs. Without source, you’re limited to the stock manufacturer ROMs and modifying the ROMs themselves. I’m pretty familiar with Android modification, I used to be huge into it. Back in the day when Samsung was slow to update, and we were running leaked ROMs with kernels that had code “injected” to get them working due to lack of source code.

  • Trollsten Senpai

    The update is full of bugs on my phone (Motorola Droid Razr m) it will freeze and reboot on itself as well as causeing apps to forceclose all the time

  1. GOLDENGuest 10 months ago

    I like that Motorola dorid

  2. CastuisGuest 10 months ago

    Having the source code is more about porting over roms or developing new ones for the device, it’s also better to head over to XDA forums than to github. This author doesn’t seem to familiar with Android dev imo.

    • The source code is used to build new kernels, which is what is most important. Without source, kernels cannot be modified. Often enough, the situation is that an AOSP ROM cannot run on the stock kernel, it needs a modified kernel to run properly. Which is why source is important, with source you can modify kernels to start porting various ROMs. Without source, you’re limited to the stock manufacturer ROMs and modifying the ROMs themselves. I’m pretty familiar with Android modification, I used to be huge into it. Back in the day when Samsung was slow to update, and we were running leaked ROMs with kernels that had code “injected” to get them working due to lack of source code.

  3. Trollsten SenpaiGuest 10 months ago

    The update is full of bugs on my phone (Motorola Droid Razr m) it will freeze and reboot on itself as well as causeing apps to forceclose all the time