Jun 26 AT 1:32 PM Dima Aryeh 8 Comments

Samsung Exynos 5433 benches significantly higher than Qualcomm Snapdragon 805

Exynos 5433 benchmark

Samsung used to be known for making the best mobile processors in the world. Back in the days of the Hummingbird and the original Exynos 4, Samsung was unbeatable, and frankly, Qualcomm had nothing good to offer. Things are very different today, with Qualcomm chips performing admirably and Samsung chips disappearing from the US market.

Even though Exynos chips have not been in the news lately, it doesn’t mean that Samsung isn’t working on something special. The Exynos 5433 showed up on AnTuTu benchmarks recently and it beat Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 805 by a considerable margin. For pre-production hardware and software, the Exynos performed really well. However, the NVIDIA Tegra K1 still beat it, because NVIDIA chips always bench really well.

Benchmarks mean very little in terms of day to day usage. Old Snapdragon chips benched fairly well, but were laggy and overall unpleasant in day-to-day use. Though the new Exynos 5433 benches well, we’ll have to use it to see if it’s that good. And sadly, we may never get to. Qualcomm’s monopoly on the US market isn’t fun.

Via: Pocket Now

Source: AnTuTu

Dima Aryeh is a Russian obsessed with all things tech. He does photography, is an avid phone modder (who uses an AT&T Galaxy Note II), a heavy gamer (both PC and 360), and an aspiring home mechanic. He is also an avid fan of music, especially power metal.

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  • http://www.jeffkibuule.com Jeff

    Performance numbers without power consumption numbers are pretty meaningless. That’s like saying a Ferrari is faster than a Prius without giving you the miles per gallon on each.

  • Nathan Strutz

    About that K1… when will I be able to buy a device that uses it? And you know I’m not talking about a $1024 3D mapping tablet, I want a general use toy. I’m holding out on upgrading my original Nexus 7.

    • http://www.androidandme.com Dima Aryeh

      Probably not, NVIDIA said that they give up on the mobile device game aside from gaming devices.

  • mernen

    “Back in the days of the Hummingbird and the original Exynos 4, Samsung was unbeatable, and frankly, Qualcomm had nothing good to offer.”

    Wait, what? The Hummingbird was released in June 2010. The Snapdragon was already over 7 months old by then (HTC HD2, then the Nexus One), and still it was the undisputed king in CPU performance due to its NEON support. GPU performance was quite poor, for sure, but Qualcomm was already nearing its second generation to fix that by then.

    • http://www.androidandme.com Dima Aryeh

      The Snapdragon S4 Plus and Pro were both, in my opinion, very poor processors. In day to day use, they were never smooth and had performance issues. The Snapdragon 600 wasn’t any good to me either, same deal. Never smooth. Snapdragon 800 was the first chip that actually impressed me, and I LOVE it.

      • mernen

        Certainly there was a time when even HTC were considering abandoning Qualcomm, but that absolutely was not during the Hummingbird days. As I said, Hummingbird was released between S1 and S2, and you’re talking about quite a few years later.

  • Sikulrn

    Surely the bigger issue is that if you get an Exynos powered device, you’ll be hampered getting anything other than Samsung written setup as they’re dont fully publish all of the specs like the more open market CPUs. I’m all for them developing kick ass processors and making all the bits in the phone, power to them, but if they cant publish all the specs to allow Cyanogen etc to develop for my phone then its probably not worth it..

  • jayden

    i dont know but, exynos really doesnt get my attention, i always see snapdragon Socs more apealing or maybe im just a qualcomm fanboy (flies away….)

  1. Performance numbers without power consumption numbers are pretty meaningless. That’s like saying a Ferrari is faster than a Prius without giving you the miles per gallon on each.

  2. Nathan StrutzGuest 10 months ago

    About that K1… when will I be able to buy a device that uses it? And you know I’m not talking about a $1024 3D mapping tablet, I want a general use toy. I’m holding out on upgrading my original Nexus 7.

  3. “Back in the days of the Hummingbird and the original Exynos 4, Samsung was unbeatable, and frankly, Qualcomm had nothing good to offer.”

    Wait, what? The Hummingbird was released in June 2010. The Snapdragon was already over 7 months old by then (HTC HD2, then the Nexus One), and still it was the undisputed king in CPU performance due to its NEON support. GPU performance was quite poor, for sure, but Qualcomm was already nearing its second generation to fix that by then.

    • The Snapdragon S4 Plus and Pro were both, in my opinion, very poor processors. In day to day use, they were never smooth and had performance issues. The Snapdragon 600 wasn’t any good to me either, same deal. Never smooth. Snapdragon 800 was the first chip that actually impressed me, and I LOVE it.

      • Certainly there was a time when even HTC were considering abandoning Qualcomm, but that absolutely was not during the Hummingbird days. As I said, Hummingbird was released between S1 and S2, and you’re talking about quite a few years later.

  4. SikulrnGuest 10 months ago

    Surely the bigger issue is that if you get an Exynos powered device, you’ll be hampered getting anything other than Samsung written setup as they’re dont fully publish all of the specs like the more open market CPUs. I’m all for them developing kick ass processors and making all the bits in the phone, power to them, but if they cant publish all the specs to allow Cyanogen etc to develop for my phone then its probably not worth it..

  5. jaydenGuest 10 months ago

    i dont know but, exynos really doesnt get my attention, i always see snapdragon Socs more apealing or maybe im just a qualcomm fanboy (flies away….)