Aug 25 AT 10:51 PM Taylor Wimberly 37 Comments

The T-Mobile G2 just got a little bit faster, MSM7230 CPU confirmed

A couple of weeks ago I was the first to speculate the T-Mobile G2 would contain Qualcomm’s new MSM7230 CPU, but then several leaks kept suggesting it would be a regular old Snapdragon. Thanks to the G2 software dump we can now confirm the G2 will ship with the newer 1 GHz MSM7230.

So what exactly does the MSM7230 have to offer? We initially labeled it as a budget-Snapdragon since Qualcomm’s press release said it was destined for “mainstream smartphones”, but now it looks like it will offer about the same performance as Samsung’s Hummingbird chip or TI’s OMAP3630.

Based on all the info we can gather the MSM7230 is a 45nm system-on-chip which contains a similar Scorpion CPU as the previous Snapdragon (QSD8x50) matched with an Adreno 205 GPU. The new Adreno 205 offers about 4x the graphics performance of the previous Snapdragon (Adreno 200), which is around the equivalent of a PowerVR SGX535. Support for HSPA+ 14.4 Mbps and HDMI out are other notable features.

The Adreno 205 GPU is also believed to be in the dual-core Qualcomm QSD8672, which first appeared in the HTC Glacier benchmarks that everyone went crazy over. It should offer plenty of power to run all the Gameloft HD titles, but we still expect the GPU inside Samsung’s Hummingbird is a tad faster.

So while the T-Mobile G2 might not break any benchmark records, it should still offer similar performance to the latest Android phones from Motorola and Samsung. When you consider it will be running stock Android 2.2 and support T-Mobile’s HSPA+ network, that might make it the most desired phone when it launches next month (at least until dual-core chips ship).

For an idea of what kind of performance to expect, check out the following video of some early Qualcomm MSM7x30 dev units.

Via: Cyanogen

Taylor is the founder of Android and Me. He resides in Dallas and carries the Samsung Galaxy S 4 and HTC One as his daily devices. Ask him a question on Twitter or Google+ and he is likely to respond. | Ethics statement

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