Nov 18 AT 9:56 AM Nick Gray 7 Comments

Motorola Mobility shareholders give Google acquisition vote of approval

googorola-2

Motorola Mobility’s shareholders have voted, and they gave the Googorola deal two thumbs up. Motorola Mobility released a statement this morning, revealing that 99 percent of the 74 percent of shares represented at a Special Meeting of Stockholders voted in favor of the Google and Motorola Mobility acquisition agreement, which would give current shareholders $40.00 per share in cash.

We are pleased and gratified by the strong support we have received from our stockholders, with more than 99 percent of the voting shares voting in support of the transaction. We look forward to working with Google to realize the significant value this combination will bring to our stockholders and all the new opportunities it will provide our dedicated employees, customers and partners. Sanjay Jha CEO of Motorola Mobility

Now that the shareholders have given the deal their vote of confidence, the only real hurdle remaining is approval of the acquisition by the US government, which could come in early 2012. While many are unsure of the impact this acquisition will have in the mobile segment, Google has maintained that Motorola would not get any special treatment that may alienate other OEMs who use Android on their devices.

The one big change we’d like to see is for Motorola to scrap MotoBLUR in favor of a stock Android experience on their devices. What changes do you see in Motorola’s future if the acquisition does go through in the next few months?

Show Press Release

Motorola Mobility Stockholders Approve Merger with Google

Nov. 17, 2011

LIBERTYVILLE, Ill. — Nov. 17, 2011 — Motorola Mobility Holdings, Inc. (NYSE: MMI) (“Motorola Mobility”) today announced that at the Company’s Special Meeting of Stockholders held today, stockholders voted overwhelmingly to approve the proposed merger with Google Inc. (NASDAQ: GOOG) (“Google”).

Approximately 99 percent of the shares voting at today’s Special Meeting of Stockholders voted in favor of the adoption of the merger agreement, which represented approximately 74 percent of Motorola Mobility’s total outstanding shares of common stock as of the October 11, 2011 record date for the Special Meeting.

Sanjay Jha, chairman and CEO of Motorola Mobility, said, “We are pleased and gratified by the strong support we have received from our stockholders, with more than 99 percent of the voting shares voting in support of the transaction. We look forward to working with Google to realize the significant value this combination will bring to our stockholders and all the new opportunities it will provide our dedicated employees, customers, and partners.”

As previously announced on August 15, 2011, Motorola Mobility and Google entered into a definitive agreement for Google to acquire Motorola Mobility for $40.00 per share in cash, or a total of approximately $12.5 billion. The Company previously disclosed that it expected the merger to close by the end of 2011 or early 2012. While the Company continues to work to complete the transaction as expeditiously as possible, given the schedule of regulatory filings, it currently believes that the close is expected to occur in early 2012. It is important to note however, that the merger is subject to various closing conditions, and it is possible that the failure to timely meet such conditions or other factors outside of the Company’s control could delay or prevent the Company from completing the merger altogether.

Nick is a tech enthusiast who has a soft spot for HTC and its devices. He started HTCsource.com (the first HTC blog) back in 2007 and later joined the Android and Me family in the summer of 2010.

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  • josegb2011

    Or or or …don’t call me blur combined with stock android becoming the new android theme..I sure wouldn’t. Mind even though ics new look is awesome..

  • https://plus.google.com/u/0/109535302829097218747/posts RekAviles

    We hav enough companies making phones. Lets focus on other devices like GTV and some docking accessories.

  • http://None Javier Bastardo

    I still can’t believe that Google isn’t planing to do anything special to Motorola. Sure they need to respect the other OEMs and what Android and their alliances is all about, but having a line of pure Android-experience phones can’t change that much the industry, instead of MotoBLUR put stock Android, use Motorola to experiment in the phone department without calling them Nexus, so any other manufacturer can get their fair chance at making one.

    Google makes it sound like they actually bought Motorola for just the patents, and I don’t believe this one bit.

    • http://htcsource.com Nick Gray

      I think the biggest reason for the purchase revolves around Motorola’s patents. Microsoft and Apple have stepped up their legal game against Android. I don’t think Google would compromise its relationship with other OEMs by giving Motorola and advantage in the marketplace, but I do see Google using Motorola as a huge resource for prototype devices to allow Google to push Android ahead with the latest technology.

      For now, we can only speculate. We’ll have to see how things play out once Washington approves the deal.

  • Jack

    I was wanting this so bad. I just got an ATRIX 2. I hate MOTOBLUR. I was extremely nervous about getting this phone, but the changes they made to blur is far better than what it was. I wants pure android experience and I hope that this actually helps give me that. I have a feeling this was more than just patents too. They are important yes, but think there is more behind the scenes. I still think Google should have bought palm instead of letting HP buy them.

  • http://theandroidappshow.com Lane Montgomery

    I hope the acquisition will mean more timely updates for Motorola devices, set the pace for the rest of the industry.

    But I really think it will give them a hardware advantage like no other company has. I think we’ll see more experimentation in what runs Android and how those devices interact with each other. By owning a hardware company Google can spur platform innovation in ways they can’t by just partnering.

  • pritams

    Sound of joy…