Apr 02 AT 3:06 PM Clark Wimberly 38 Comments

Threads are finally here. Join the league.

android-and-me-threads-post-img

If you’ve been paying attention around here lately, you know that big changes are afoot. A few months back we rolled out tweaks to our scoring system. More recently, we launched new user profile pages. When we deployed those changes, astute users noticed an extra tab, not yet live.

That tab was for Threads and we’re happy to announce that they’re finally here. Threads aim to be a lot of things, but at the core I guess you’d call it our version of a forum (just don’t let it hear you call it that). We’ve spent a lot of time on boards over the years, and recently even more time blogging, and Threads are a mashup of the two.

Threads do a lot of things differently than some forums, most notably costing you points to start a new thread. While anyone can participate in the comments (just like on a regular blog post), starting a new thread is a privilege reserved for users with enough points to previously prove themselves trustworthy. We hope that restricting posting new threads even a little bit will help with the traditional noise ratio you find on some forums.

Starting a thread won’t just cost you points, because you’ll actually earn points back for each comment your thread gets. We hope this light competition will foster a creative and thoughtful environment, not unlike our real blogging practices. Speaking of which, exemplary threads are actually eligible to get promoted up to a real article on Android and Me.

If you’d like to learn more about how threads will function, you can check the documentation in our new Docs section or just dive into Threads now.

Some recent threads

To get things rolling, I thought it’d be fun to post some of the active threads we’ve had over the past week of beta testing.

#thenextinstall Help us pick the next apps in the rough – Taylor is using this thread to source apps for his weekly column where he reviews little-known yet awesome applications and games.

Review your Galaxy Note for a free case – Besides points, sometimes a thread can earn you real prizes, as was the case with this challenge. Three lucky users scored a new case from @SpeckProducts.

The future of tablets – Pontificating on the future of tablets, and why they aren’t more utilized as text books and the like.

Best looking Android device? A quest to find the best looking Android device, from a strictly hardware standpoint.

What’s your favorite Twitter app? – The age old question: which Twitter client reigns supreme?

In addition to always being located at /threads, you’ll be able to find the most recent threads in the sidebar, visible on almost any page on the site. We hope that you guys enjoy this tool as much as we did building it. Join us in Threads and let us know what you’re up to in the world of Android!

Oh, and if you somehow still don’t have an And Me Account, it’s never too late to join!

Clark is a developer living in Austin, Texas. He runs ClarkLab, a small web firm with his wife, Angie. He's a big fan of usability, standards, and clean design.

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  • http://www.anthonydomanico.com Anthony Domanico

    I’m already in too many leagues. Most notably the one for extraordinary gentleman. I’m the butler.

  • Jeff Pan

    Threads are gonna be fun and informative

  • http://androidandme.com Taylor Wimberly

    These are a cool chance to launch some fun experiments. It will be interesting to see who really takes advantage of them.

  • BiGMERF

    wow very depressed i was not part of the beta….

    • http://clarklab.net Clark Wimberly

      I posted it on twitter like 10 times.

    • droiddewd

      I saw it and got a DM from Clark Thanks BTW Clark :O) but then I went to check it out and had a total mental block for a thread. Hope to have something good though soon. I like the evolution this site has taken in the past few months. Truly the best Android site!

  • cwjones4

    I really enjoy everything you guys do with this site, and how user friendly it is. keep it up!

  • _AjD

    I absolutely love the idea of needing points to start a new thread – I hope it works out as planned

  • Joel

    Sounds fun guys, thanks for your continued efforts to keep me entertained. Threads sounds like a pretty bright idea, looking forward to scoring big n winning stuff – a fine addition indeed. Now bring out the women!

  • Robert Hallock

    Costing points to start a discussion? Are you deliberately attempting to quash participation and innovation in your community, or is that merely a happy accident of a very bad idea that is completely hostile to new users getting engaged?

    • thekaz

      It doesn’t restrict new users from participating in discussions on the blog posts, or off the threads which are created. I think it is a good idea. I think most of the people with high rankings and a lot of points earned them by adding a lot of value to the discussions, often raising good points not mentioned in the main blog post.

      I like that that moderators are allowing those who have earned the trust of the community here the first chance to share ideas and thoughts outside of the blog articles posted on the main page.

    • kwills88

      If you’ve ever been on other “forums” mainly tech ones, you’ll see that ppl post a lot of repetitive stuff that ends up making the forums cluttered for no reason, but by limiting and making these requirements, the threads will have more quality threads than a bunch of threads with no value.

      This is merely a great solution for having quality over quantity.

      • Robert Hallock

        This is symptomatic of bad community management. If you are unhappy with the content of your community, then you should be looking to the owners and operators questioningly for setting the wrong tone and permitting the inappropriate content to reach critical mass.

        Forbidding new users from engaging the community with new threads and new ideas shifts the blame from where it belongs, the moderators and administrators, to the users.

        It’s bitterly anti-user, and insulting to boot.

        • http://clarklab.net Clark Wimberly

          This is symptomatic of bad community management. If you are unhappy with the content of your community, then you should be looking to the owners and operators questioningly for setting the wrong tone and permitting the inappropriate content to reach critical mass.

          But we are setting the tone. The tone we want is from dedicated, knowledgeable users who understand how our site runs.

          Forbidding new users from engaging the community with new threads and new ideas shifts the blame from where it belongs, the moderators and administrators, to the users.

          I’m sure you won’t like this, but lots of times bad content is the fault of the community. I know that on many forums I’ve made silly and useless threads that didn’t need to exist. If I’d been charged for those threads, I might not have wasted my time on them.

          It’s bitterly anti-user, and insulting to boot.

          I think you’re wrong, join us in the threads and we can discuss it.

    • skugern

      I agree to a point. Just because someone hasn’t posted a lot in the past shouldn’t prevent them from posting in the future. Conversely just because someone has posted a lot in the past doesn’t exactly mean they will be posting quality comments in the future (for example, posting “I agree” or “down with apple!” comments got your score up in the past).

      I do applaud the effort to squash people posting anonymously and trolls.

      • http://clarklab.net Clark Wimberly

        “Just because someone hasn’t posted a lot in the past shouldn’t prevent them from posting in the future.”

        We’re working on that one with a neat tool called The Kloutulator.

      • thekaz

        To me, the theory behind the scores is to reward those who contribute good ideas and comments. The quality of which was judged by the community here. I think, in theory, it more or less works. Sure, a funny shot at Apple or the first “Apple sucks!” comment often gets a lot of +’s. No system is perfect, but over the long run, I think it will work out.

        Advice for the new users – please join in the conversation and contribute value to the conversation. The community will, I believe, reward you. It doesn’t necessarily take a long time to move up in rank.

      • Robert Hallock

        Quashing bad posts and anonymous trolls is a matter of community management: moderators prepared with a knowledge of what this community stands for, and the kind of content it is looking for. The rest can be summarily deleted.

        Yes, users will bitch about “free speech” or “censorship,” but this is a private site and its members ultimately play by its rules. Users who have nothing but positive and helpful things to contribute will never run afoul of this sort of moderation, because this moderation is uniquely tailored to stomp out the crap.

        The chosen option, however, punishes *all* users irrespective of their potential for contributing to the community. It’s the nuclear option that blames the users, rather than a more mature acknowledgment that poor oversight has created a culture where users feel “anything goes.”

        Is my proposed format of organic community growth more time-consuming? Yes, of course it is, but now is the decision point. Using the system to control the flow weeds out the chaff, but also abuses the innocents. Using good, human moderators weeds out the chaff and does *NOT* abuse the innocents or your community’s potential for unexpected contributions.

        Which sounds better to you?

        • http://clarklab.net Clark Wimberly

          Quashing bad posts and anonymous trolls is a matter of community management: moderators prepared with a knowledge of what this community stands for, and the kind of content it is looking for. The rest can be summarily deleted.

          Instead of deleting them, we’re hoping they are never created in the first place.

          Yes, users will bitch about “free speech” or “censorship,” but this is a private site and its members ultimately play by its rules.

          Instead of censoring people or making rules, we’re trying to let the community help make the rules.

          The chosen option, however, punishes *all* users irrespective of their potential for contributing to the community. It’s the nuclear option that blames the users, rather than a more mature acknowledgment that poor oversight has created a culture where users feel “anything goes.”

          Wrong. We aren’t punishing all users. We added functionality for hundreds of users. Users that have high scores due to participation over time on this site. No user is punished. All users, even new ones and guests, have the same rights that they did yesterday (even with new places to use them!)

          Is my proposed format of organic community growth more time-consuming? Yes, of course it is, but now is the decision point. Using the system to control the flow weeds out the chaff, but also abuses the innocents. Using good, human moderators weeds out the chaff and does *NOT* abuse the innocents or your community’s potential for unexpected contributions.

          In the long run, I think my system is more organic. Instead of each thread passing through a chopping block of judgement, a user must first grow roots in our community and first prove that he or she wants to be here. There are enough hit and run communities around the web, we’re trying something different.

          Which sounds better to you?

          Well I think you know my choice.

    • http://clarklab.net Clark Wimberly

      The other guys have pretty much covered it, but yes, the point is for only trusted users to start threads. Once a thread exists, anyone can comment on it, just like a blog post.

      Like the other said, and like I said in my post, if you’ve ever spent much time on other forums you’ll notice that a huge number of posts were useless/spam/reposts and we hope this helps solve that.

      A new user can join, leave solid comments, and be posting threads in a matter of days.

      • Robert Hallock

        This falls to the domain of effective community management, Clark. If you are unhappy with the content of your site, then it falls squarely on Androidandme’s shoulders for not setting the proper tone and cultivating an environment where crap posts are naturally discouraged.

        I don’t mean to attack you or your website, but I find it insulting and hostile to shift the blame onto the users. The sins of ineffective CMing have allowed the site to get to the point where *all* new users are forbidden from engaging with new ideas in new threads.

        The same goes for these other tech sites: crap content means crap community management.

        If you spend enough time pruning shitty posts–the “FIRST!” and “LOL APPLE SUCKS” comments–then people will eventually get the hint that it’s not tolerated. This is not a matter of free speech or censorship, because it’s your site and your users play by your rules. You can be accommodating to everything under the sun except for your definition of crap posts, and train your moderators to do the same–it’s the “iron fist in a velvet glove” style of community management.

        Eventually your lame posters will take a cue and take a hike, leaving a community that organically gravitates towards the kind of content you’re looking for. This is the direction that all communities should take, not the resentful scolding this maneuver represents.

        • http://androidandme.com Taylor Wimberly

          If you were logged in, you would already have enough points to start a thread :)

        • http://clarklab.net Clark Wimberly

          This falls to the domain of effective community management, Clark. If you are unhappy with the content of your site, then it falls squarely on Androidandme’s shoulders for not setting the proper tone and cultivating an environment where crap posts are naturally discouraged.

          Again, I think you’re mistaken. I’m thrilled with the content on our site. Since we added the user system and new profiles, we’re at an all time high of awesome users. What we wanted to do was give these most trusted users a place to post even more. The tone is set and I want more of it.

          I don’t mean to attack you or your website, but I find it insulting and hostile to shift the blame onto the users. The sins of ineffective CMing have allowed the site to get to the point where *all* new users are forbidden from engaging with new ideas in new threads.

          Again, this sounds like you think there is sound giant rowdy section of Threads that we’re shutting off. There was no ‘getting to a point’.

          The same goes for these other tech sites: crap content means crap community management.

          If you spend enough time pruning shitty posts—the “FIRST!” and “LOL APPLE SUCKS” comments—then people will eventually get the hint that it’s not tolerated. This is not a matter of free speech or censorship, because it’s your site and your users play by your rules. You can be accommodating to everything under the sun except for your definition of crap posts, and train your moderators to do the same—it’s the “iron fist in a velvet glove” style of community management.

          You’re so subscribed to the old style of community management I’ll likely never change your mind, just know that there are lots of communities online that run themselves. I’ve been a long-time member on a forum that was built around the idea and has since be launched and re-launched a half dozen times, deeply exploring the ties of permissions/buddies/mods/etc. I know this looks like a wacky idea but I’ve really put a lot of thought into the type of community I want and I think this is it. If we try it for a while and it’s not, we can always reevaluate.

          Eventually your lame posters will take a cue and take a hike, leaving a community that organically gravitates towards the kind of content you’re looking for. This is the direction that all communities should take, not the resentful scolding this maneuver represents.

          I’d love to live in world where lame posters can take a cue, until then I’m going to keep exploring innovative solutions.

  • wicked4u2c

    Love the threads idea however, would be nice if things were categorized that way we can read what we want rather than having to look through pages and pages of content to find something that we are interested it in.

    • http://clarklab.net Clark Wimberly

      Right now we’ve just got a handful of categories, which you can find under the thread titles. We’ve also got a tagging system in place, it’s just not available on the template site yet. Coming soon!

  • McLovin

    How about a score of how many points you give (generocity) and another score on how many you down (bully) vote others?

  • Alex Pena

    The need for points to create a thread is just genius!

  • http://www.infotainmentempire.com pekosROB

    Dude this is so awesome I can’t even begin to explain!!

    For awhile I’ve been wanting a way to communicate and ask the AndroidandMe crowd their thoughts and opinions or suggestions with my technological needs/choices. Some other sites have sections like this but this makes me like this site even more.

    I think I need to head on over to Klout and give y’all some more rep!!

  • spazby

    great, thanks

  • Cole Loomis

    Well hopefully after graduation rolls around I will be able to contribute some stuff to the site.

  • Waspdroid

    Great work!

  • Nathan D.

    Your threads are as awesome as everything else on this site :-) first site I go to every time.

  • seabass978

    Ok I’m going to start a thread since I’m a well trusted and conceived user , why can’t every manufacturer have batteries like Motorola razor max but make it removable.

  • Stigy

    Just wanted to let you know I love this idea so far. There have been nothing but informative posts and content in the Threads section.

    Can’t wait until I can start my own threads to start some great discussion topics!

  • bolanrox

    can’t say i disagree with the point system, just based on experiences on other non boards – the amount of trolling or even posting threads asking or the same question (by the same person in many cases) in 5 different sub forums, something is needed if you want to keep things clean and tidy.

  • HardNoks

    i can tell this is going to be absolutely great

  • Paul Atreides

    Great reason for me to finally join the ranks.

  • sap 26

    I can’t wait to see what threads get started by the “veterans” of the site. You guys are coming up with unique ideas that definitely set Android and Me apart from the rest.

  1. I’m already in too many leagues. Most notably the one for extraordinary gentleman. I’m the butler.

  2. Threads are gonna be fun and informative

  3. These are a cool chance to launch some fun experiments. It will be interesting to see who really takes advantage of them.

  4. wow very depressed i was not part of the beta….

    • I posted it on twitter like 10 times.

    • I saw it and got a DM from Clark Thanks BTW Clark :O) but then I went to check it out and had a total mental block for a thread. Hope to have something good though soon. I like the evolution this site has taken in the past few months. Truly the best Android site!

  5. I really enjoy everything you guys do with this site, and how user friendly it is. keep it up!

  6. I absolutely love the idea of needing points to start a new thread – I hope it works out as planned

  7. Sounds fun guys, thanks for your continued efforts to keep me entertained. Threads sounds like a pretty bright idea, looking forward to scoring big n winning stuff – a fine addition indeed. Now bring out the women!

  8. Robert HallockGuest 3 years ago

    Costing points to start a discussion? Are you deliberately attempting to quash participation and innovation in your community, or is that merely a happy accident of a very bad idea that is completely hostile to new users getting engaged?

    • It doesn’t restrict new users from participating in discussions on the blog posts, or off the threads which are created. I think it is a good idea. I think most of the people with high rankings and a lot of points earned them by adding a lot of value to the discussions, often raising good points not mentioned in the main blog post.

      I like that that moderators are allowing those who have earned the trust of the community here the first chance to share ideas and thoughts outside of the blog articles posted on the main page.

    • If you’ve ever been on other “forums” mainly tech ones, you’ll see that ppl post a lot of repetitive stuff that ends up making the forums cluttered for no reason, but by limiting and making these requirements, the threads will have more quality threads than a bunch of threads with no value.

      This is merely a great solution for having quality over quantity.

      • Robert HallockGuest 3 years ago

        This is symptomatic of bad community management. If you are unhappy with the content of your community, then you should be looking to the owners and operators questioningly for setting the wrong tone and permitting the inappropriate content to reach critical mass.

        Forbidding new users from engaging the community with new threads and new ideas shifts the blame from where it belongs, the moderators and administrators, to the users.

        It’s bitterly anti-user, and insulting to boot.

        • This is symptomatic of bad community management. If you are unhappy with the content of your community, then you should be looking to the owners and operators questioningly for setting the wrong tone and permitting the inappropriate content to reach critical mass.

          But we are setting the tone. The tone we want is from dedicated, knowledgeable users who understand how our site runs.

          Forbidding new users from engaging the community with new threads and new ideas shifts the blame from where it belongs, the moderators and administrators, to the users.

          I’m sure you won’t like this, but lots of times bad content is the fault of the community. I know that on many forums I’ve made silly and useless threads that didn’t need to exist. If I’d been charged for those threads, I might not have wasted my time on them.

          It’s bitterly anti-user, and insulting to boot.

          I think you’re wrong, join us in the threads and we can discuss it.

    • I agree to a point. Just because someone hasn’t posted a lot in the past shouldn’t prevent them from posting in the future. Conversely just because someone has posted a lot in the past doesn’t exactly mean they will be posting quality comments in the future (for example, posting “I agree” or “down with apple!” comments got your score up in the past).

      I do applaud the effort to squash people posting anonymously and trolls.

      • “Just because someone hasn’t posted a lot in the past shouldn’t prevent them from posting in the future.”

        We’re working on that one with a neat tool called The Kloutulator.

      • To me, the theory behind the scores is to reward those who contribute good ideas and comments. The quality of which was judged by the community here. I think, in theory, it more or less works. Sure, a funny shot at Apple or the first “Apple sucks!” comment often gets a lot of +’s. No system is perfect, but over the long run, I think it will work out.

        Advice for the new users – please join in the conversation and contribute value to the conversation. The community will, I believe, reward you. It doesn’t necessarily take a long time to move up in rank.

      • Robert HallockGuest 3 years ago

        Quashing bad posts and anonymous trolls is a matter of community management: moderators prepared with a knowledge of what this community stands for, and the kind of content it is looking for. The rest can be summarily deleted.

        Yes, users will bitch about “free speech” or “censorship,” but this is a private site and its members ultimately play by its rules. Users who have nothing but positive and helpful things to contribute will never run afoul of this sort of moderation, because this moderation is uniquely tailored to stomp out the crap.

        The chosen option, however, punishes *all* users irrespective of their potential for contributing to the community. It’s the nuclear option that blames the users, rather than a more mature acknowledgment that poor oversight has created a culture where users feel “anything goes.”

        Is my proposed format of organic community growth more time-consuming? Yes, of course it is, but now is the decision point. Using the system to control the flow weeds out the chaff, but also abuses the innocents. Using good, human moderators weeds out the chaff and does *NOT* abuse the innocents or your community’s potential for unexpected contributions.

        Which sounds better to you?

        • Quashing bad posts and anonymous trolls is a matter of community management: moderators prepared with a knowledge of what this community stands for, and the kind of content it is looking for. The rest can be summarily deleted.

          Instead of deleting them, we’re hoping they are never created in the first place.

          Yes, users will bitch about “free speech” or “censorship,” but this is a private site and its members ultimately play by its rules.

          Instead of censoring people or making rules, we’re trying to let the community help make the rules.

          The chosen option, however, punishes *all* users irrespective of their potential for contributing to the community. It’s the nuclear option that blames the users, rather than a more mature acknowledgment that poor oversight has created a culture where users feel “anything goes.”

          Wrong. We aren’t punishing all users. We added functionality for hundreds of users. Users that have high scores due to participation over time on this site. No user is punished. All users, even new ones and guests, have the same rights that they did yesterday (even with new places to use them!)

          Is my proposed format of organic community growth more time-consuming? Yes, of course it is, but now is the decision point. Using the system to control the flow weeds out the chaff, but also abuses the innocents. Using good, human moderators weeds out the chaff and does *NOT* abuse the innocents or your community’s potential for unexpected contributions.

          In the long run, I think my system is more organic. Instead of each thread passing through a chopping block of judgement, a user must first grow roots in our community and first prove that he or she wants to be here. There are enough hit and run communities around the web, we’re trying something different.

          Which sounds better to you?

          Well I think you know my choice.

    • The other guys have pretty much covered it, but yes, the point is for only trusted users to start threads. Once a thread exists, anyone can comment on it, just like a blog post.

      Like the other said, and like I said in my post, if you’ve ever spent much time on other forums you’ll notice that a huge number of posts were useless/spam/reposts and we hope this helps solve that.

      A new user can join, leave solid comments, and be posting threads in a matter of days.

      • Robert HallockGuest 3 years ago

        This falls to the domain of effective community management, Clark. If you are unhappy with the content of your site, then it falls squarely on Androidandme’s shoulders for not setting the proper tone and cultivating an environment where crap posts are naturally discouraged.

        I don’t mean to attack you or your website, but I find it insulting and hostile to shift the blame onto the users. The sins of ineffective CMing have allowed the site to get to the point where *all* new users are forbidden from engaging with new ideas in new threads.

        The same goes for these other tech sites: crap content means crap community management.

        If you spend enough time pruning shitty posts–the “FIRST!” and “LOL APPLE SUCKS” comments–then people will eventually get the hint that it’s not tolerated. This is not a matter of free speech or censorship, because it’s your site and your users play by your rules. You can be accommodating to everything under the sun except for your definition of crap posts, and train your moderators to do the same–it’s the “iron fist in a velvet glove” style of community management.

        Eventually your lame posters will take a cue and take a hike, leaving a community that organically gravitates towards the kind of content you’re looking for. This is the direction that all communities should take, not the resentful scolding this maneuver represents.

        • If you were logged in, you would already have enough points to start a thread :)

        • This falls to the domain of effective community management, Clark. If you are unhappy with the content of your site, then it falls squarely on Androidandme’s shoulders for not setting the proper tone and cultivating an environment where crap posts are naturally discouraged.

          Again, I think you’re mistaken. I’m thrilled with the content on our site. Since we added the user system and new profiles, we’re at an all time high of awesome users. What we wanted to do was give these most trusted users a place to post even more. The tone is set and I want more of it.

          I don’t mean to attack you or your website, but I find it insulting and hostile to shift the blame onto the users. The sins of ineffective CMing have allowed the site to get to the point where *all* new users are forbidden from engaging with new ideas in new threads.

          Again, this sounds like you think there is sound giant rowdy section of Threads that we’re shutting off. There was no ‘getting to a point’.

          The same goes for these other tech sites: crap content means crap community management.

          If you spend enough time pruning shitty posts—the “FIRST!” and “LOL APPLE SUCKS” comments—then people will eventually get the hint that it’s not tolerated. This is not a matter of free speech or censorship, because it’s your site and your users play by your rules. You can be accommodating to everything under the sun except for your definition of crap posts, and train your moderators to do the same—it’s the “iron fist in a velvet glove” style of community management.

          You’re so subscribed to the old style of community management I’ll likely never change your mind, just know that there are lots of communities online that run themselves. I’ve been a long-time member on a forum that was built around the idea and has since be launched and re-launched a half dozen times, deeply exploring the ties of permissions/buddies/mods/etc. I know this looks like a wacky idea but I’ve really put a lot of thought into the type of community I want and I think this is it. If we try it for a while and it’s not, we can always reevaluate.

          Eventually your lame posters will take a cue and take a hike, leaving a community that organically gravitates towards the kind of content you’re looking for. This is the direction that all communities should take, not the resentful scolding this maneuver represents.

          I’d love to live in world where lame posters can take a cue, until then I’m going to keep exploring innovative solutions.

  9. Love the threads idea however, would be nice if things were categorized that way we can read what we want rather than having to look through pages and pages of content to find something that we are interested it in.

    • Right now we’ve just got a handful of categories, which you can find under the thread titles. We’ve also got a tagging system in place, it’s just not available on the template site yet. Coming soon!

  10. How about a score of how many points you give (generocity) and another score on how many you down (bully) vote others?

  11. The need for points to create a thread is just genius!

  12. Dude this is so awesome I can’t even begin to explain!!

    For awhile I’ve been wanting a way to communicate and ask the AndroidandMe crowd their thoughts and opinions or suggestions with my technological needs/choices. Some other sites have sections like this but this makes me like this site even more.

    I think I need to head on over to Klout and give y’all some more rep!!

  13. great, thanks

  14. Well hopefully after graduation rolls around I will be able to contribute some stuff to the site.

  15. Great work!

  16. Your threads are as awesome as everything else on this site :-) first site I go to every time.

  17. seabass978Guest 3 years ago

    Ok I’m going to start a thread since I’m a well trusted and conceived user , why can’t every manufacturer have batteries like Motorola razor max but make it removable.

  18. Just wanted to let you know I love this idea so far. There have been nothing but informative posts and content in the Threads section.

    Can’t wait until I can start my own threads to start some great discussion topics!

  19. can’t say i disagree with the point system, just based on experiences on other non boards – the amount of trolling or even posting threads asking or the same question (by the same person in many cases) in 5 different sub forums, something is needed if you want to keep things clean and tidy.

  20. i can tell this is going to be absolutely great

  21. Paul AtreidesGuest 3 years ago

    Great reason for me to finally join the ranks.

  22. I can’t wait to see what threads get started by the “veterans” of the site. You guys are coming up with unique ideas that definitely set Android and Me apart from the rest.